Trending March 2024 # Fix “App Is Damaged Can’t Be Opened” Error Messages In Mac Os X # Suggested April 2024 # Top 10 Popular

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Some Mac users have discovered they are unable to open some applications downloaded from the Mac App Store. When attempting to open an impacted app in Mac OS, a message stating “Name.app is damaged and can’t be opened. Delete chúng tôi and download it again from the App Store.” Another variation is a pop-up window appearing asking a user to “Sign in to use this application on this computer” requesting an Apple ID and password.

The reason these app can’t be opened error messages are appearing may be because of a code signing security certificate expired, in which case this is not user error or anything to do with user involvement, it’s basically something with DRM that was messed up on the Mac App Store side but is now impacting some applications that were downloaded from there. Sometimes it can also be the result of a fluke issue when downloading an app from the App Store. Yes, this is a strange and frustrating error message, but it’s easily resolvable.

Resolving the “App is damaged and can’t be opened” Error in Mac OS X

This error message tends to appear in new versions of Mac OS X:

Reboot the Mac, this alone may be sufficient to fix the problematic apps and remove the error message

If a reboot does not fix the app, delete the application (just drag it to the Trash and empty), then re-launch the Mac App Store and download the app again via the Purchases tab or by searching for the app manually

Open the once impacted apps again, they should now work fine

Method 2: Fixing “App is damaged and can’t be opened” Error on Mac App Launch

If the above approach does not work, you may need to include a few additional steps:

Delete the app in question from the Mac

Log out of the Mac App Store

Restart the Mac

Upon reboot, open the Mac App Store and log in to the App Store again

Re-Download the app in question

This “App is damaged and can’t be opened” error message occasionally happens even in modern macOS releases like macOS Big Sur. Fortunately, deleting the app, rebooting, and re-downloading it again usually resolves the issue quickly.

Resolving the “Sign in to use this application on this computer” Error in Mac OS X

Another variation of this error message may appear in older versions of Mac OS X:

Close the “sign in to use this application” error dialog box when you see it, and reboot the Mac instead

Upon reboot, open the Mac App Store and log in to your Apple ID to re-authenticate the Mac and all related apps

Open the apps as usual

That should be all that is required to get your apps working again in OS X.

The Quick App Error Fix for Advanced Mac Users: Killing a Process

You can target the storeaccountd processes via Activity Monitor if you want, or use the command line if you are comfortable with the Terminal:

sudo killall -v storeaccountd

There are typically two “storeaccountd” processes running, one as user, and one as root, and thus using killall on both is sufficient to resolve the issue.

Those interested in learning a bit more about the technical details behind these error messages can refer to this Twitter thread, which reveals the certificate that expired and speculates on various contributing factors.

— Paul Haddad (@tapbot_paul) November 12, 2024

Obviously if you haven’t seen these error messages on your Mac, you have nothing to worry about, and can go about your merry way. But, should you see them, at least know it’s a simple fix, the apps aren’t actually damaged, it was just an error on the Apple side of things with a quick remedy.

Note that you may sometimes see a similar but different error message stating the particular Mac “app is damaged and can’t be opened, you should move it to the Trash” which has a different potential set of solutions.

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Fix Repeated “Your Message Could Not Be Sent” Messages Error On Mac

Mac users may encounter a pop-up error originating from the Messages app in Mac OS which informs them “your message could not be sent”. Often when this error dialog appears, it’s seemingly out of nowhere or when a Mac wakes from sleep or has rebooted.

While it’s possible to encounter the “your message could not be sent” error for legitimate sending failures, or because iCloud or iMessage is down (very rare), it’s also possible the error can appear due to a syncing issue in which case there is nothing to adjust, and the solution in that case is a bit goofy.

The full text of the error you might see, as well as the three options is: “There was an error sending the previous message. Would you like to send it again? Ignore – Open Messages – Resend Message” You can choose ignore, and the error likely comes right back immediately. You can choose Open Messages, and you will also usually see the same error again. If you choose “Resend Message” if there wasn’t a failed message, you may end up re-sending an old message, or nothing may happen at all. Clear as mud, right? Anyway since this is a bit of a nuisance, here is what you should do if you experience this on a Mac.

1: Check iMessage & iCloud Settings

Before anything else, make sure iMessage settings and iCloud are enabled as expected on the Mac. It’s possible to encounter this error message when an iMessage or text message has actually failed to send from the Mac, in which case you can almost always resolve the issue by double-checking Messages app preferences and making sure the Mac is configured to send messages, text messages, and has iCloud enabled and logged in.

Check the Apple ID / “iCloud” system preference panel and make sure iCloud and Messages are enabled and logged in as expected.

From the Messages app, pull down the “Messages” window and choose Preferences, and make sure account settings are configured and enabled as expected.

2: The Repeatedly Cilck “Ignore” Solution

Yes, it’s just as dumb as it sounds! If you continuously encounter the “Your message could not be sent” error when turning a Mac on after it has been off for a while, or waking a Mac from sleep after it has been asleep for a while, the error could be due to a curious syncing issue with the Messages app, and not an actual message send failure. The solution in this case is to repeatedly ignore the dialog window, which seems to reappear for about the total number of messages which need to sync with another iOS device or Mac using the same Apple ID.

Eventually, the error message goes away, presumably because all of the unsynced iMessages will have synced properly between all same-Apple ID Apple devices and things will work again as expected.

3: Make Sure Text Forwarding is Enabled on iPhone

You can often remedy message issues on the Mac, by turning to your iPhone. Say what? This is because the Mac relies on the iPhone to relay text messages, so we need to make sure this feature is enabled.

Try to send the message again, it should go through just fine.

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How To Disable The Dashboard In Mac Os X

The Dashboard in Mac OS X was first introduced in version 10.4, and can be used to run many useful widgets (ie. calendar, package tracker, weather). Even though it can come in handy for checking quick stats and info, it often goes unused by Mac users.

Since there really isn’t a point in having it running if you’re not going to use it, here’s how you can disable the Dashboard in Mac OS X.

Open Terminal and enter the following commands:

defaults

write

com.apple.dashboard mcx-disabled

-boolean

YES

killall

Dock

Finder will restart automatically and there will be no more dashboard.

If you ever want to re-enable the Dashboard, enter these commands in Terminal:

defaults

write

com.apple.dashboard mcx-disabled

-boolean

NO

killall

Dock

Again, Finder will restart and the Dashboard will be back as it if never left.

via Addictive Tips

Charnita Fance

Charnita has been a Freelance Writer & Professional Blogger since 2008. As an early adopter she loves trying out new apps and services. As a Windows, Mac, Linux and iOS user, she has a great love for bleeding edge technology. You can connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and LinkedIn.

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How To Change The Mail Font Size In Mac Os X

The default font size in the Mail app for Mac OS X is size 12 for emails and messages that are lacking styling, which tends to be most communications that are sent by email.

If you find the font size in Mail for Mac to be too small, or even too big, you’ll be pleased to know that changing the text size of email messages is quite simple. Not only can you change the font size for the email content itself, but also for other components of an email message, including the sender, recipients, subject line, and even the message list.

While we’re going to focus on changing the actual font size, it should be noted that users can also easily change the font family or face as well. From a readability standpoint, it’s the font size that most users may find improves their Mail app experience.

How to Adjust the Font Size of Mail App in Mac OS X

This can be used to adjust the font sizes in Mail app either down or up, and the process is the same regardless of which version of Mac OS is installed on the Mac.

Open Mail app if you haven’t done so already

Optional but recommended: select / open an email message to see a live preview of the changed mail font size for

Pull down the “Mail” menu and select “Preferences”

Choose the “Fonts & Colors” tab and adjust the following:

Close out of Mail Preferences when satisfied with the change

A change in font size can make a considerable difference in readability in either direction, this is particularly true if a users eyesight isn’t perfect or even if you’re just trying to avoid eyestrain and spend a lot of time sending and receiving emails.

For example, here’s an email message in Mail app for MacOS and Mac OS X with the default font size:

And here’s the same email message in the Mac Mail app with a font size increased to size 18:

While that may look too large for some users, it may be perfect for others, it really depends on user preference, and the screen size of the display in use. This is specific to the actual Mail app in Mac OS X, meaning if your default email client is set to something else, or even to webmail, you’d need to adjust those settings separately. For web mail users like Gmail, Yahoo, and Hotmail, simply increasing the browsers text size with a zoom keystroke is typically sufficient.

This obviously covers the Mac side of things, and remember that iPad and iPhone users can also change the mail text size on iOS to accommodate their preferences.

Keyboard Shortcuts for Increasing & Decreasing Font Size in Mail for Mac

It’s worth mentioning that you can also change the font size of emails you are actively composing by using the ‘Format’ menu in Mail app too, and there are two handy keyboard shortcuts for increasing and decreasing Mail font size using the Formats menu:

Command + to increase font size

Command – to decrease font size

You can also access those formatting options from the ‘Format’ menu within Mail app. These keystrokes are found in many other places in Mac OS for increasing and decreasing font size, including Safari, so they may already be familiar to you.

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Mount & Unmount Drives From The Command Line In Mac Os X

You can mount and unmount drives, volumes, and disks from the command line of MacOS and Mac OS X.

This trick works with external USB disks, hard drives, Firewire, Thunderbolt, DVD’s, CD’s, network drives, even USB thumb drives, literally any volume that can be mounted and accessed through the incredibly helpful diskutil command. By using the command line to remount the drive, the entire process can be completed remotely if necessary through SSH, and without ever having to physically disconnect a drive from the Mac. This is infinitely useful for troubleshooting situations, for scripting and automation, and it’s a great trick for those of us who just like to tinker around in Terminal.

How to Unmount a Drive from Command Line on Mac

Let’s first cover unmounting drives. To do this you’ll need another volume attached or connected to the Mac in some form or another, then launch Terminal to get started (sits in /Applications/Utilities/).

1: List All Drives

The first thing you’ll need to do is list the connected drives. This will provide a list of all drives that are attached to the Mac, that are either mounted and unmounted, and all of their respective partitions. We are doing this so we can get the drive identifier, which is typically something like disk1s2, or disk2s2, etc

diskutil list

The output will look something like this:

2: Apple_HFS OSXDaily 15.7 GB disk1s2

For the sake of this example, we’ll focus on the attached drive named “OSXDaily”, which happens to be an external USB thumb drive that appears last in the list. Note the identifier for that drive is “disk1s2” and we’ll carry that to the next series of commands to unmount and remount it.

It’s probably worth mentioning that drives will always be located in /dev/ and thus /dev/ will always be prefixed to the identifier.

2: Unmount the Specified Drive

Still using the diskutil command, we’ll point it at the drive in question to unmount.

diskutil unmount /dev/disk1s2

This will report back the named volume and location has been unmounted, like so:

Volume OSXDaily on disk1s2 unmounted

That’s all there is to it. You’ll notice the drive is no longer accessible in Finder, but it will still be visible through diskutil from the command line, or the more familiar Disk Utility app in Mac OS X’s GUI.

How to Mount a Drive from the Command Line on Mac

If you can unmount a drive, of course you can mount or remount one too. The command sequence is very similar; locate the volume, then mount the drive.

1: Find the Drive to Mount

If you already know where the volume is located, you can ignore part 1 and jump straight to part 2, but let’s cover retrieving the volume identifier anyway. This time around we’ll shorten it a bit because we’ll assume we know the name of the drive to mount, thus we only need to locate the identifier. We’ll do this by using grep to shorten the output of the diskutil command like so:

2: Apple_HFS OSXDaily 15.7 GB disk1s2

That output is obviously much shorter than the full output of diskutil list which we showed above.

For this example, the drive “OSXDaily” is still located at /dev/disk1s2 and that’s what we’ll mount.

2: Mount (or Remount) the Drive

To mount (or remount) a drive, we’ll use the same diskutil command with a new flag and inputs like so:

diskutil mount /dev/disk1s2

Using the same examples as elsewhere, here is what the command and the output will look like:

Volume OSXDaily on /dev/disk1s2 mounted

This obviously mounts the drive again, and it will also make the mounted volume visible again in the Mac OS X Finder and to GUI-based apps in the various Open or Save dialog boxes.

How to Unmount & Remount a Drive / Volume in a Single Command

Want to quickly unmount and remount the same volume, essentially power cycling it’s connectivity to the Mac? You can do that in a single command by stringing the two together like so:

Want to quickly unmount and remount the same volume, essentially power cycling it’s connectivity to the Mac? You can do that in a single command by stringing the two together like so:

diskutil unmount /dev/disk1s2;diskutil mount /dev/disk1s2;echo "Remounted Volume"

This would look like the following when executed:

Remounted Volume

If you happened to be watching the volume in the Finder during this process, you would find it to disappear briefly, then reappear almost immediately. The last echo portion is optional but it makes the entire command action even more verbose.

Thanks to Nilesh for the tip inspiration

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Create A Contact Sheet Of Thumbnails With Automator In Mac Os X

Contact Sheets, often called Proof Sheets, are essentially columns and rows of image thumbnails, making a bunch of photos very easy to quickly review. Though they’re commonly used by photographers, they have a wide range of uses outside of the pro-photography world, from artists to designers to UI/UX engineers. Rather than creating a contact sheet by hand the hard way in Photoshop or Pixelmator, we’ll show you to instantly generate one that is fully customized, all you’ll need to do is select a group of pictures in the Mac file system and let the excellent OS X app Automator do the hard work. Everything used here is free and bundled into Mac OS X, there’s no need to buy anything else or download any other apps.

The end result will be able to contact sheet PDF file that is a specified paper size with a chosen number of thumbnail columns, saved to where ever you want, and it will look something like this:

The resulting file is smart enough to not overwrite itself too, and it will automatically append the date and time to the file name like “My Contact Sheet on 04-06 at 2.42.36 PM.pdf” so that you can’t overwrite one proof sheet with another if several have been created. Enough talk, let’s get started!

Create the Contact Sheet Generator Service

This will create a service that generates contact sheets instantly for you:

Launch Automator, found in /Applications/, and from the File menu choose “New”

Choose “Service” from the new menu

At the top, look for “Service receives selected:” and choose ‘image files’

Set the Contact Sheet customizations under “New PDF Contact Sheet”, including where to default to saving the file to (~/Desktop is standard), the Paper size, and how many columns will be shown

When satisfied with the customizations, go to File then “Save” and give the automator service a name like “Make Contact Sheet”

Quit out of Automator if you’re satisfied, or leave it open if you want to try out the results and then make adjustments based on what you find.

The hard part is now over, and that wasn’t so tough was it? Now let’s go ahead and make a new contact sheet almost instantly from the OS X Finder.

Make a Contact Sheet by Generating from Selected Images

Now that the Automator Service has been created, making a contact sheet is just a matter of selecting images and letting the generator do the work for you:

Locate and select any number of images in the OS X Finder

Wait a few seconds or a few minutes, depending on if you chose a handful of images or hundreds for the PDF file to generate

Go to the ~/Desktop (or where ever else the save location was chosen) to find the generated PDF

The file generation is usually extremely fast, though how long it takes is going to partially depend on how fast your Mac is, and of course how many pictures you chose for the sheet. If you used a folder of 500 high resolution images, it will take a couple minutes usually, versus generating the sheet from a collection of 50 lower resolution pictures, which takes only a few seconds. For this reason, it can be a good idea to scale down images before creating a contact sheet from particularly humungous files, but if you find yourself having to perform a ton of image resizing you can also create a simple ‘Batch Resize’ Service with Automator, or just do a manual bulk resizing process on a group of pictures using Preview app, which also comes with every version of Mac OS X.

Open the file in Preview to see how the generated sheet looks, it will have followed the guidelines chosen during your initial setup so if you’re not happy with it make some changes to the Service and just save it again, then generate a new sheet PDF.

Generally speaking, numbers that are consistent multiples of the columns chosen during the creation of the service look best. Meaning, if you picked 6 columns, anything that is a multiple of 6 (12, 24, 36, 600, etc) will tend to look the best, so that each column and row is even. Also, images that are of the same width tend to look best as well, since it creates an even amount of white space between them.

Here’s another example of the output of this Automator Service, this one showing a 3 column layout with wide images:

And no the images contained in the example proofs are not my pictures, they are from the hidden wallpaper collection buried in OS X 10.8 and later.

Enjoy!

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